Edinburgh's Festivals

Edinburgh’s Festivals

Edinburgh’s Festivals

Edinburgh's Festivals

Edinburgh’s Festivals

Make the Most of Edinburgh’s Festivals
If it’s a party you’re after, then Edinburgh can make it happen. There’s a party atmosphere that spreads throughout the city and it’s a haven for fun-lovers all year round. From pubs and clubs to theatres and music venues, Edinburgh has a range of entertainment to suit all tastes. สล๊อตเว็บตรงแตกง่าย

These are just a few of the many excellent Edinburgh festivals. You can also enjoy Edinburgh’s excellent shopping and gourmet culture, as well as the wildlife and nature that surround the city on all sides. Edinburgh’s Festivals

Whatever festival you attend in Edinburgh, you’ll find it’s a full, vibrant city – 24 hours a day. The spirit is contagious, and you can feel it everywhere. It’s not just on the few traditional Edinburgh holidays such as St. Andrews Day (17March) or the July Edinburgh Fringe (30th to 31st), but on everyday holidays, such as Good Friday, Easter Sunday, the Bank Holiday and Christmas Day. Even if you live in the south of the country, you’ll have plenty of opportunities to enjoy the festivals.

The Edinburgh Hogmanay celebration is sure to take you by surprise as thousands of people descend on the city to celebrate and parade their favourite pet. The celebration longest gone in the British Isles, it was first witnessed in the Danish capital, Copenhagen, in the year 972 A.D. Needless to say, the first celebration in the new British capital, Edinburgh, didn’t arrive until the year 1535! Nonetheless, the festivities continue apace. In the month of May, the Edinburgh Military Tattoo, a world record of military bands, plays a lively musical finale to the festivities. Edinburgh’s Festivals

Even if you can’t see the Scottish Forth Bridge during your stay in Edinburgh, if you visit often over the years it’s a good place to remember it. Every day at 1pm, the Scottish folkloric festival transforms the old town with stories and crafts and painters and artists and musicians and a market that sells a range of quality goods. Although the sculptures and headline artists are often from contemporary Scotland, there is often an appearance of the Scottish Wilderness Museum’s David Rosset. This outdoor museum has, over the years, collected evidence of the wonders of early man’s heritage and is now a leading tourist attraction in Edinburgh. Edinburgh’s Festivals

After a sobering World War II victory, Edinburgh has celebrated in full by turning itself into a festival. This year it’s the Edinburgh Military Tattoo, which will see 400 WW2,53 Maritime, Naval and Highland regiments compete with one another and eight Streamline regiments parade at the Edinburgh Roads entrance to the city. However, there is much more to Edinburgh’s festival than just war memories.

Every year from early August to September, Edinburgh stages a festival of classical music at the Edinburgh International Music Competition, which has also been called the EdImentum Open Air Music Competition. The competition is largely considered to be one of the largest international music events in Europe and offers a spectacular programme of up to 24 musical performances by different orchestras. 2004’s event was said to have featured some of the world’s major orchestras and featured such orchestras as Mahler, Handschenr’s and Tchaikovsky with a spectacular production of Rossini’s Firebird and a world premiere of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra at St.ropolis.

But, despite its historic roots, Edinburgh festivals don’t just rest on traditional entertainment. Edinburgh celebrates literature too in 2006, with the Edinburgh Shakespeare Festival. This is the fifth year that the festival has played host to a major Shakespeare festival, and each year the programme is as successful as ever. While Shakespeare’s plays examination in the Festival are in competition with other stage productions, this year’s festival also featured a trek through the English countryside by Peter Holland, a night of culinary delights and an auction of spellings, to name just a few of the activities.

But, in spite of the historic link to Edinburgh, there are many other cities in England that have also produced writers and demonstrate the same artistic prowess. Covent Garden, London, has long been considered the birthplace of the theatre and theatre has been part of the cultural scene in the city since the seventeenth century, with many of the grandest theatres opened in the west end. But, it is in the east of the city that the most prominent theatre in the country, the Theatre Royal, is based. It was founded in 1894 and is currently in its 30th year.

The fame of the Theatre Royal can be attributed to its success in securing the DR Toland Memorial Prize for sculpture in the 1995, following on from the success of the Covent Garden Opera House.

Edinburgh's Festivals